Blogs

Radical Remissions From Cancer: 9 Key Factors

Dr Kelly Turner has extensively researched the factors involved in radical remissions of cancer (typically called "spontaneous remissions" or "spontaneous regressions" in the medical literature) and found there are 9 factors that are common to all such cases. They are

• Radically changing your diet
• Taking control of your health
• Following your intuition
• Using herbs and supplements
• Releasing suppressed emotions
• Increasing positive emotions
• Embracing social support
• Deepening your spiritual connection
• Having strong reasons for living

As Dr Turner explains "It is important to note that these are not listed in any kind of ranking order. There is no clear “winner” among these factors. Rather, all nine were mentioned just as frequently in my interviews.”

Dr Kelly Turner, "Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds" (www.radicalremission.com)

Implied hierarchies

I noticed on a forum yet again reference to 'implied hierarchies' ... how we need special training, rituals, meditation, special potions and so forth to advance to the next level of 'spiritual awareness'. And worst of all, how our egos are inhibiting us from getting 'there'.

All of which implies, or explicitly states that we poor humans are 'less than' some perceived higher authority, spirit, God etc.

Project Manage Your ...

Recently I sat in a meeting of people who discussed all sorts of spiritual matters and ideas, including the law of attraction etc.

When discussing the law of attraction, I asked a simple question that caused a fair bit of upset. And it's an obvious question that is often ignored, or avoided when people talk about 'attracting abundance' into their lives.

The question is this: what value are you adding to your community, in order to reasonably expect abundance will be given you?

Gut feelings guide

More research to support our intuitive abilities connect and guide

"They found that the feelings participants expressed verbally about their marriages had little bearing on their later happiness. Instead, it was their inner ‘‘gut-feelings’’ - only revealed by the tests - that counted."

Right the boss of left

There's an exceptionally insightful and wise article in today's Sydney Morning Herald newspaper, and it's precisely what I've been helping to explain for a number of years.

In our Australian political system, the (ostensibly) left-wing political party "Labor" has been exemplary in producing a strong economy, with low interest rates, AAA credit rating1 and low unemployment -- but none of that mattered sufficiently to keep them in government.

Today's article explains:

"At last. God's in his heaven and all's right with the world. The rightful rulers of this country are back in charge, so now things can only get better."

Ross Gittins (the author of the article) is alluding to our unconscious desire for a firm hierarchical order, with bosses in charge, and workers following orders. And this relates back to our childhood need for strong authority. In other words, we're still children at heart, in terms of our cultural maturity and world-view.

It would seem we're still in stage 3 of our cultural development. Or at least we've slid back, of late, to that stage.

On the subject of vaccination

It is quite often the source of heated debate — whether or not to vaccinate children.

A couple of ideas might help those who are unsure, or who are pro-vaccination.

Firstly, what is that we want?

Do we want to live in fear, believing we are vulnerable to infections, or would we like to live knowing we can, and regularly do, fight off diseases as a natural process of life?

The danger in "being offended"

There is, in my opinion, a troubling trend in our modern societies, when people respond with "I find that offensive".

In basic terms to take offence is to blame others for how one feels, which places the responsibility and choice of one's own emotional states with another. As Viktor Frankl so succinctly explained "the last of human freedoms (is) the ability to choose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances".

The subtext of 'being offended'

In recent times I've observed a growing trend for people (e.g. in online forums) to write "I find that offensive" in response to someone's ideas or opinions.

So I penned a few words and submitted them to an online forum.

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In my experience, online forums are relatively feckless forms of communication, in that they lack the immediacy of face-to-face interactions. Venues at which people get to meet and really dig deep (e.g. via Bohmian/OpenSpace/World-Cafe style groups) can be extraordinary experiences.

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