Stephen's blog

The power of the reciprocal test

Recently enjoyed a few email exchanges with a well-meaning, good-natured friend.

The communications included ideas concerning "God".

Now, as I have found in many such "arguments" there are entrenched views that aren't often swayed by counter-arguments — here's one example where simple straight-forward reasoning didn't change this person's belief one bit, it seems.

Be that as it may, there is a very helpful technique that enables one to see the bias in beliefs.

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The jig is up

There is an astonishingly deep and dangerous disconnect between our mainstream world view, and reality. So deep and dangerous is that disconnect I believe it imperils the survival of the human race. That disconnect is demonstrated by modern science's approach: that for every physical effect, there is (in theory) a physical cause. If someone is sick, a physical cause is sought. A bacteria perhaps? Hence the widespread use of antibiotics. It is a simple matter to show that these mechanical-world views are wrong. Dangerously wrong.

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Predicting the same responses

Dear me. It's so predictable.

According to an article in the New Scientist1, a highly respected psychologist has done experiments that reveal a slight ability to 'feel the future' (as in precognition).

"A year ago ... Daryl Bem, a well-respected psychologist at Cornell University, New York, reported some positive (precognition) results in the Journal of Personal and Social Psychology (vol 100, p407). 'When Daryl speaks, we listen,' says Jeff Galak, of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania."

The article details the experiments, revealing that people will make choices of pictures, words or objects that -- more often than chance --  will be of those that later had been pre-arranged to be presented to them.

What is interesting about the article is not the experimental evidence itself. That's a done deal many times over. Princeton's PEAR laboratories had around 30 years of consistent research to confirm mind-matter and precognitive abilities, before it closed up shop, citing no need to continue because ...

The enormous databases produced by PEAR provide clear evidence that human thought and emotion can produce measureable influences on physical reality. The researchers have also developed several theoretical models that attempt to accommodate the empirical results, which cannot be explained by any currently recognized scientific model.

And of course "not mentioning" Wheeler's Delayed Choice experiments showing a much more substantial experimental basis within deep reality of future influences effecting the past (or more correctly, present choices effecting which past is experienced).

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Solitude fuels creativity

From a NYTImes article

"The Rise of the New Groupthink"

Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption. And the most spectacularly creative people in many fields are often introverted, according to studies by the psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist. They’re extroverted enough to exchange and advance ideas, but see themselves as independent and individualistic. They’re not joiners by nature.

and

Solitude has long been associated with creativity and transcendence. “Without great solitude, no serious work is possible,” Picasso said. A central narrative of many religions is the seeker — Moses, Jesus, Buddha — who goes off by himself and brings profound insights back to the community.

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If you are not shocked ...

Some years ago I read that Nobel Laurette and physicist Niels Bohr reportedly remarked that "Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it".

In more recent times Prof. David Albert of Columbia University similarly explained that

There's something really indescribably strange about the picture that we're presented with of ourselves by -- especially by fundamental physics. And it's a picture that we just don't know how to fully take in. And I think it's very, very, very disturbing.

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The power of engagement

Just had a marvelous chat with a good friend.

Again and again I'm reminded of the power of engaging in conversation with people.

There's something that happens which seems to amplify my creative thinking and insight.

In the past I've focused on being a writer, but the chat with my friend unearthed a heap of new perspectives (both by him and myself, much of it new to both).

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Points to remember

As mentioned in "Let's get clinical" and "for the 100th time", I've noticed a penchant for many people to believe in limiting systems.

Unfortunately, I forget on occasions the same very principles that I espouse.

A recent example was that of a lovely woman who professed to be an astrololger. Instead of my inviting her to consider some examples of  dynamic and fluid potentials available to her, I joked about her beliefs in a condescending manner. Not good.

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Let's get clinical

While at the wonderful Gulgong Folk Festival recently I chatted to many people, and learned about many diverse and interesting world-views. I'm realising that people will accept and actively champion limitations and fixed beliefs because it serves them to do so. Fixed-systems beliefs gives stability and structure to people's lives (a common example being 'astrology'). And this acceptance occurs despite those beliefs stifling, limiting and denying wonderful potentials and possibilities. Chatting to a young woman at the festival who was open to the deeper quantum-possibilities of life got me thinking of the benefits from sharing good, sound belief-system concepts. As a result I'll start setting up "belief clinics" focused on "Joy, Peace, Ease, Love and Laughter" -- we'll be focused on having fun, ease, laughter and 'letting go' limiting, fixed beliefs about the past, the present and the future.

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and your box is ...

Recently at a music festival at which I was helping the organisers, I got chatting with some people (separately), and the contrast between them was stark.

First, I got chatting to a lovely woman who had (has) a deliciously cheeky sense of humour. An example: when passing by a group of young men she was asked "do you have a match?", to which she replied, easy as "what, do I look like a smoker, a girl guide?". The response: stunned silence. She then soothed, explaining she had a spare packet of matches and they could keep them. The reaction was hilarious to watch -- they thought she was the best thing since sliced bread. They couldn't stop thanking her. Impeccable timing, sure to be sure (the festival did have an Irish contingent).

But ... as much as I was attracted to this lovely woman, she ... unfortunately, was an astrologer. "Oh dear", I thought, "this ain't going to end well". We exchanged ideas, beliefs. Apparently the year I was born makes me a goat. Funny that ... I quite enjoy "acting the goat", but I'm not so sure about being a billy. She apparently was a rabbit. Funny that .. we compared palms, mine showing much more evidence of beta-carotene colouration. So here was a goat evidently more keen on carrots than this lovely rabbit. As I said, I fairly quickly concluded our little flirtation wasn't going anywhere substantial.

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