Stephen's blog

All God, all good

Yesterday had an interesting, somewhat intense discussion with someone who confessed to being a Christian.

It seems to me that there are some very simple, fundamental errors in thinking by Christians (as a general rule — and don't get me started on rules, systems, probabilities, and individuality. "We're all individuals"  yeah, yeah, I'm not. Kudos to Monty Python. But i digress).

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The Truth will NOT set you free

I've known this a long time, but I need to keep reminding myself

The Truth will most definitely NOT set you free.

Think about it. You're driving along and you find a billboard with "The Truth" written on it. Does it set you free?

Hardly.

No, the Truth, in any form, in any book, will NOT set you free, but living your truth certainly will.

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What's missing from The Law of Attraction?

In recent years there's been much talk of the Law of Attraction, popularised in the film "The Secret".

As with many systems of belief, there is a great deal that is helpful and uplifting about the "Law of Attraction".  We can and do attract favourable (or unfavourable) 'things' into our lives, based on our beliefs.

But the attractive principle is a deeply feminine energy - it's reliant on the receptive (on receiving); of being open and inviting.

What's missing is quite simple to see and appreciate: the masculine energy of deliberate, forceful 'action.'

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Insourcing the masculine

Last night as I watched a televised studio-debate on sexual harassment in the workforce, I found that I was feeling increasingly troubled. This trouble I sense is of particular relevance and importance to those who want to get great outcomes.

During the debate about how bad and uneducated the perpetrators were it seemed to me that a great big elephant in the room was being steadfastly ignored.

In terms of sexual harassment, what's that 'great big elephant in the room'? There's actually two of them, but I digress.

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Rest-stops in the sky

[update, October, 2016: see below]

Over the years I've come to more fully appreciate the extent to which many people seek refuge in illusory ideals ... be it religious perfection, or scientific certainty.

As I've explained elsewhere on this and the Belief Institute website, the ideal of perfection (and of perfect scientific certainty) was born around the time of Plato, and has persisted ever since. In spiritual new-age teachings and practices, it's the seeking of spiritual perfection — of transcending one's ego and finding one's perfect higher self1; in religion it's the perfection of God and of the Pope's infallibility; in science it is the certainty and control of life expressed through some equation or theory, perhaps most tellingly exemplified by the incorrect and unsupportable assumptions surrounding the solutions to Zeno's Paradoxes that date back nearly 2,500 years.

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An ego by any other name still smiles like one

Last night while enjoying a wonderful dinner I had the pleasure of engaging conversation with a number of intelligent men on matters philosophical.

It became evident that some held beliefs that were rooted in the ideal of perfection: the age-old belief that when we get 'over there' or perhaps 'up there' everything will be 'perfect' (at which time, we'll have 'transcended' the troubling, fault-ridden ego).

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Control of 'psycho-destiny'

Recently I had a fairly involved, long chat with a friend about the deeper frameworks and dynamics of life. What came to light was how much we both knew but weren't applying to our own lives.

In particular was the realisation that we were both on the path of learning, and needing to learn how to 'let go' the pressures of society to be responsible, and to simply be ourselves, independent of the opinions of, and commitments to others.

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Don’t compete, CREATE!

As a small business owner, you've probably heard about the growing need for creativity and innovation. Let's put things in perspective. Firstly, we know that franchised businesses are generally more profitable and successful. We've heard the rule-of-thumb regarding the 80/20 rule. 80% of small businesses go out of business in the first 5 years, while the reverse is true of franchises - 80% of franchises are not only still in business, but thrivingE-myth.

So what do franchises get right? Good systems, and strong marketing. Do you need to be a franchise in order to have good systems? No, there's good-value help available from companies such as "Brain in a box" who focus on providing robust, effective systems for small businesses.

At the very least, reading and applying Michael Gerber's E-Myth material (on systemising the business) is invaluable to your future business success. But having good systems is only half the story - creativity, innovation or being imaginative is highly important to small businesses, and increasingly so. Research confirms that Einstein was right all along.

Imagination really is more important and profitable than knowledge. Experience, and what you know about your market, together with good systems is helpful, but new data reveals that entrepreneurial startups are the real engine of economies:

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The immense importance of understanding 'masculine' and 'feminine'

By coincidence I've only recently (namely, this morning) come across a 1991 paper by Prof. Robert Jahn of Princeton's famous1 PEAR laboratory.

Jahn's paper is quite extraordinary, at least for me, for it covers many of the basic concepts that I wrote about in my book Be and Become.2

One of the central points of Jahn's paper is that not understanding the complementarity of 'masculine' and 'feminine' fuels "immensely destructive" behaviours and results, both personally and socially. From Jahn's paper:

When posed in polar opposition, whether within a single personality, or in the context of the ubiquitous interactions between the male and the female sexes, the failures of this interface are legion, legendary, and immensely destructive, both personally and socially. Yet, when deployed in constructive complementarity, the masculine/feminine integration within the individual can enable the highest creativity and personal satisfaction, and in the male/female partnership can generate some of the highest accomplishments, profoundest insights, and most beautiful resonances of human existence. In this form, it is probably the species' most powerful resource for spiritual as well as physical survival and evolution.

Why I concur with Jahn is that the deeper nature of what 'feminine' and 'masculine' actually mean is not widely understood or appreciated.

  • 1. or infamous, according to skeptics and assorted naysayers. See my article on sceptics and their brethren
  • 2. I used to think that I was well ahead of other thinkers on the subject of the deep frameworks of life, but Jahn has demonstrated he largely got there first! I suppose my contribution is the comprehensiveness of my work, going well beyond that of Jahn's paper. Still, I freely give recognition when it is appropriate and deserved.

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Sex, and fear of the feminine

One of the ongoing issues we can observe and experience in life is the repeated 'war of the sexes'.

We see it so many different forms .. of left-wing and right-wing politicians1 arguing over the virtues of privatisation of public infrastructure, nasty divorce settlements, inequality of pay for men and women, lower life expectancy for men and particularly black or indigenous men, and so on.

It seems to me however that the ongoing issues surrounding sexual harmony is one of the most important for the majority of the populace.

As explained, the failure to understand the nature of 'masculine' and 'feminine' results in "immensely destructive" behaviours, both personally and socially.

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